The pacifier debate.

I posted about pacifiers on my facebook page and reviewed an absolute torrent of answers, which of course differed so widely that there is no conclusion to be had other than ‘your babies, your choice’.

Given the amount baby Ivy screams, I am really pro. The problem is, that both AW and her auntie are really anti, saying it will ruin their teeth etc. I don’t want them to have dummies over the age of 6 months, and most people who say they’ve used them say that the babies start to reject them as they get older. AW fears she will be permanently addicted to a dummy.

I want to use it mainly when Ivy is overtired and hysterical and needs to sleep. She really doesn’t like to sleep.

Are there any horror stories out there whereby anyone has used pacifiers/dummies and their child has refused to give them up? Or where their child’s speech has been negatively affected?

I’m here with little Ivy now and thought again about pacifiers because she was sucking on her bottle but not drinking… When the bottle is removed, she cries. . So I popped one in. She is a different baby- so so calm! No one here but me.

Opinions.. It seems AW feels pretty strongly about it. I’m not sure what to do.

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7 thoughts on “The pacifier debate.

  1. I have heard of a few instances where bubs completely refuse to give up their dummies (aka pacifiers) and their parents have a struggle to make it happen, but only a few. (Usually telling them that the fairies need them or something works hehe)

    I honestly believe that there is NO issue whatsoever in using a dummy, and we use them for Elijah. He only uses his when he’s sleepy though – we don’t really offer it any other time and he doesn’t o looking for it.

    You’ve got an interesting debate on your hands, I hope you can all come to some agreement 🙂

    Oh, and the tooth thing? Utter rubbish as far as I know – old wives tale.

  2. If it keeps her from crying I would be ALL for it. We have learned to do whatever it takes to keep Noah happy. Noah takes one when he is sleepy and we usually use it to help him go to sleep. I can’t stand to hear him crying/screaming so if giving him a passy stops that I would do it. But thats just me : )

  3. I was strongly against their use, too… but when I really thought about the reason, it was because I associate pacifiers with absent parenting. As in “you’re screaming and I could help but don’t want to deal, here’s a pacifier.” And I still have a problem with them being used in that fashion. But when K was around three months and was falling asleep at the breast, not really nursing, but becoming fussy if I pulled her away, we began to use them transitionally at bedtime. My mother has also had success using them when she’s downed a whole bottle and seems to just want to continue sucking. We’ve used it now and again when we are out and about to help soothe her but overall she is not terribly interested, often sucks for a little while before spitting it out, and we have been able to keep it to certain times without any problem. Doesn’t mean it would be the same with your babies, but that’s how it worked for us. Also, I read a bit about them and was encouraged by messages about them potentially reducing the rate of SIDS, etc. mainly because I needed that litlte bit extra rationale.

  4. We are using the pacifier mainly when Jax is so upset he can’t stand himself (ie: during changes and being strapped into the car seat!) He has gone down for naps with it, but usually spits it out once he falls asleep. My sister had her pacifier until she was 3 years old, and while it didn’t impact her speech or cause any dental problems, my parents told her if she gave it up they would adopt a kitten for her. The pacifier was handed over then and there and she never went back. I think every child is different, for example, my brother only sucked his thumb and would not take a pacifier at all, and I was a combination of both and ended up sucking my thumb until I was 10. Honestly I think that thumb-sucking could be more detrimental orthodontically than a pacifier, especially when carried on past infancy.

  5. My boys both use a dummy and it was a godsend when they were little. Now they only use it at night when they fall asleep. The hardest part was having to do the dummy run in the night when they lost their dummies. I was up and down easily 8-10 time a night. Now if it falls out they dont wake up. Their dummies are on dummy holders and only M will put his dummy back in his mouth while he sleeps. L sucks his as he falls asleep and once it falls out he will sleep without it.

    I think the teeth issue is more to do with babies who constantly have a dummy in their mouth day and night.

  6. I was highly against using them as well. And then we actually had babies. Who cried. Nonstop. And would not sleep. Ever. And would get themselves so worked up and red and crazed I thought they might explode. And every night we would walk around bouncing them with one of our fingers in their mouths while they happily sucked away. Finally, we caved. Oh sweet peace. Your photo says it all. Some kids need to suck more than others, but we are ALL born with a natural reflex to suck and soothe ourselves. We were lucky that ours sort of self-weaned by 6 months. Hard to predict. I say, do it.

  7. I tried to get our babies to use pacifiers and they do sometimes but now that they have discovered their hands they just suck on their own hands / thumbs (often actually preferring that over the pacifier). I used a pacifier until I was 3 years old (maybe older) and I’m fine – no overbite or speech problems. I know other kids who used them for a while with no issue. I say use what works and figure it out later… I didn’t want our babies to suck their thumbs but if it works then whatever. Especially with twins, you’ve got to figure out how to soothe them as quickly and easily as possible – no time for gently rocking every time someone is fussy!!

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